21 April 2008

Peach Ooze and Daisies

Some color around the garden...


Engelmann's (cutleaf) daisy is a native of the blackland prairie. Seems pretty dependable thus far and I like the yellow and red...


The oranges and reds of the lantana look good with the purple/blue of the iris.

And for something completely different, this is what happens to the peaches. Ooze, ooze everywhere ooze. I'm guessing this is caused by some little critter that bores into them. Whatever it is, they destroy the peach crop--we've not had a peach from our tree yet.



9 comments:

Diana said...

Ah, Lee, at least you have peaches to ooze. I see nary a sign of fruit on my little peach tree. Green as it can be, but barren, apparently. So, what does one do about "ooze?!"

Kelly said...

Hmm, that's worrisome, seeing as how we just planted two peaches this year. The one proto-peach we had shriveled and dropped, which was probably for the best anyway.

I'd say it looks like a job for Neem oil if I knew what Neem oil was.

sister*bluebird said...

Go to my blog, click on the link to You Bet your Garden and call in to the show on Friday and ask about this. Mike McGraff usually has some useful tips for these sorts of problems.

Bonnie said...

I found this on A&M site
Q: I have two peach trees. There is a gummy-clear secretion coming from the fruit. Several peaches have prematurely dropped from the trees.

A: The fruit have been attacked by a stink or leaf footed bug of some type. The sap is oozing from the point where their mouthparts penetrated the fruit. Unfortunately, once you see the symptoms it is too late to do anything. The ones that dropped were probably stung too. Once the fruit is about the size of a quarter, they will usually stay on the tree, but the fruit will be misshapened. One will just need to cut the bad spot away. The only way to prevent such damage is to spray on 7 to 10 day intervals.

Lee said...

Nice find Bonnie! Thanks.

Don't know that I like the idea of spraying every 7 to 10 days. Is a good peach worth the chemicals, labor and cash?

I'm thinking that in this case, the stink bugs may win.

Diana said...

Lee -- There is a hilarious story about growing apples and spraying, etc. in the book "The $64 Tomato." It's a wonderful garden book about one man's trials and tribulations and I LOL'd all through it. You should read it!

sister*bluebird said...

If the stink bug is actually a squash bug, I read recently that Nasturtiums repel squash bugs. I havent tested that theory but I find it intriguing because those things are everywhere out here. They live in the deadfall over winter. With all the fire bans, its been difficult to get rid of it all, and that means getting rid of their woody habitat.

Anonymous said...

I had the same problem here in Allen, TX north of Dallas. Had a 3 year old peach tree. Last year I had a total of 5 peaches which the birds picked off before I could eat one. This year the season started off looking great. I had well over a hundred peaches start forming. Then I noticed I was losing 5 or 10 a day and the ones that made it looked just like the picture you posted. I have 2 left on the tree, both of which are deformed. My research leads me to believe a stink bug, but I didn't see any bugs earlier in the year.

shell said...

we live in saginaw, right outside of ft. worth, we have yet to eat a peach off our tree. i guess the stinkbugs are very happy! is there anything a person can do besides spraying all sorts of chemicals on the tree?